Categories
Photography

Creative Exercise:View-a-Point This assignment asks students to consider the cam

Creative Exercise:View-a-Point
This assignment asks students to consider the camera as an “object to think with.” As they read in the textbook, the technical specifications of the camera device, the practice of photography, and the meaning of photographs have changed significantly over time.
In this assignment, students will take pictures following a list of prompts. They will write a brief explanation about what they chose to photograph. They are asked to reflect on the process of composing an image in response to the prompt.
Learning Goals
Interpret the image prompt that translates the text description into a visual expression
Construct a plan for creating the image
Experiment with different interpretations of the image prompt
Describe the process of taking the image
Reflect on the meaning of the image in the context of the prompt
Directions
Choose one prompt from the List of Prompts below
Take an image from your smartphone device that shows your interpretation of the prompt you have selected from the list
You may take multiple images for that particular prompt
Select ONE image as your “Final” selection and caption it with the selected text prompt
Create a word document, include the Final Image, images that you have not selected and put them under the heading of “Process Images”, and give a Brief Description of the final image by answering the following questions:
How did you choose the subject of your image?
How did you compose the image through framing, lighting, scale?
How would you describe your aesthetic choices?
How did you come up with the concept of the image?
What new thoughts or insights emerged while you were taking these images?
List of Prompts (Choose ONE for your assignment)
A picture of your loved object without the object in it (referring to the Love Letter exercise of Module 1).
A picture that speaks.
A clear (not blurred) picture about movement.
A self-portrait that is NOT a selfie.
A picture about hope without a human in the frame
A selfie (taken by an inanimate object).
Take a picture that expresses how you’re feeling right now, with no human being appearing in the image.
Tell the story of how it felt to be in the space you’re standing in, in this moment. What does it feel like? Sound like? Smell like?
Take a picture of an object that explains the environment it is in.
Take a picture of an object that doesn’t belong where it is.
Take a picture of the inside of a human-made space from outside.
Take a picture of the outside of a human-made space from inside.
Take a picture of a color that doesn’t use the color. (e.g. show ‘yellow’ without taking a picture of anything yellow).
Show us what a person, place, or object sounds like.
Walk and look until you encounter an object, phenomenon, sensation or idea that makes you want to stop walking. Take a picture of whatever it was you were looking at when you stopped walking.
Take a picture of something the ‘wrong’ way. Hold the camera upside down, or sideways, or at some other strange angle. Put your thumb in the shot. Disobey the ‘rules’ of ‘quality’ photography.

Categories
Photography

read history of Photography from Brittanica.com. 2. Choose ONE PHOTOGRAPHER and

read history of Photography from Brittanica.com.
2. Choose ONE PHOTOGRAPHER and ONE TECHNOLOGY that you feel had the
greatest impact on the development of photography, culture or history. Use the
internet to further research the photographer and technology you choose.
3. In your own words, write a ONE PAGE, SINGLE SPACED, TIMES FONT that gives a
brief overview of the photographer and technology of your choice and supports your
feelings as to the gravity their impact on photography. Be sure to site your sources,
including the provided article or any others you might use in your research. Use
Google Docs or Microsoft Word to produce this report.
4. Submit the document via D2L
DUE MONDAY, AUGUST 29Th at midnight

Categories
Photography

-> Every source and information, needs to come from a scholarly source. NO wiki,

-> Every source and information, needs to come from a scholarly source. NO wiki, reddit, quora and other websites that are not scholarly.
-> Main information needs to come from well reviewed books and journals written by experts.
-> Before starting to write it is imperative to follow the advice from this article : https://blogs.bath.ac.uk/academic-and-employability-skills/2020/07/07/writing-your-dissertations-structure-and-sections/
-> The main focus of your research will be on how photography influences our daily lives, choices and desires. One of my lecturers stated that our reality, is structured by our fantasy. We see something, and we want it. Then we buy it, thinking our fantasy will become reality. Photography plays a big part in consumerism, because through images, we see the object and become driven by desire.
-> You’ll
be researching desire and if it is something we’re born with or something that
we are taught through photographs on social media platforms and not only.
-> You
will look into the psychology behind colours and shapes and research how they
affect the cognitive side of the brain. (Marketing psychology)
-> It would be interesting If you could do/research both focus groups
and surveys to find out how people react to different food ads, what is
appealing and what is not.
These are some of the books, I’ve researched and think
would be great for my dissertation, but you can and need to add to those.
1. Kozinets,
R., Patterson, A. and Ashman, R., 2016. Networks of Desire: How Technology
Increases Our Passion to Consume. Journal of Consumer Research.
– This focuses mainly on how technology through media,
photographs and videos/films influences our desires and urge to buy food (but
not only) in particular. In this volume, the authors demonstrate how
“foodporn” has become a real trend, thanks to networks such as: Instagram, Facebook and Pinterest. This
habit, now registered in the majority of people, pushes users to consume more
by being constantly confronted with the sight of food on social networks.
This journal is relevant to my dissertation
because digitization is experiencing a new level of desire. And the adaptation
to screens is changing the desires and impulses of users and are all linked to
photography.
2. Forrester,
M., 2000. Psychology of the image. London: Routledge.
– the book lays out a theoretical framework that combines Charles Peirce’s
semiotic principles, Ervin Goffman’s sociological insights, and Jacques Lacan’s
psychoanalytic theories. These thinkers have had a considerable impact on image
studies in fashion, advertising, photography, cinema studies, and psychology.
The subjects covered are divided into three categories. The first takes into
account mental imagery, which includes sound and dreams. The second looks at
how internal and exterior images, such as the gendered self and social
identity, are intertwined. And the 3rd theme will focus on external pictures,
such as television, film, photography, the computer, and the internet.
3. Schroeder,
J., 2002. Visual Consumption. London: Routledge.
– The image is a significant feature of the
twenty-first-century economy. Photography is an important tool for brand
development since all items are advertised through photographs, and corporate
image is paramount for economic success. In order to build a multidisciplinary,
image-based approach to analysing consumer behaviour, this book draws on art
history, photography, and visual studies. The book contains a series of images
that have been used in different campaigns and deconstructs them, so we can
understand the way photographs are brought into play to influence our desires.
OTHER REFRENCES:
4. Joyner, L., Kline, C., Oliver, J. and Kariko, D.,
2018. Exploring emotional response to images used in agritourism destination
marketing. Journal of Destination Marketing & Management,
9, pp.44-55.
5. Karthikeyan, C. and Joy, R., 2018. An Exploratory
study on Colour Psychology In Marketing. International Journal of
Research in Social Sciences, 8(9).
6. Kottler, J. A., 1999. Exploring and treating acquisitive desire: Living
in the material world. Sage Publications, Inc.
7. Mcleod, J., 2016. Colour psychology today.
John Hunt Publishing.
8. Morse, R., Lawson, D. and Mark, L., 2020. OBJECTS
OF DESIRE: Photography and the Language of Advertising. Munich: PRESTEL.
9. Oswald, L., 2012. Marketing semiotics.
Oxford: Oxford University Press.
10. Seregina, A., 2014. Exploring Fantasy in Consumer
Experiences. Consumer Culture Theory, 16, pp.pp. 19-33