Categories
Ethics

830 n.e.2d 619(iii.

Case Name: Vassilkovska v. Woodfield Nissa, INC
830 N.E.2d 619(III. App. 2005
Read Chapters 8 & 9 prior to completing this assignment. Many case studies are included in your textbook. This exercise will help you to learn vocabulary and how to analyze the case and write a brief a case.
For every Case Brief:
You must find a case related to the weekly chapter. You can pull your case from the book or from the internet as long as you cite the sources.
Please write a short synopsis of the case using the brief outline below no longer than two pages. The synopsis should be typed, double-spaced, times new roman 12 font and printed in black ink.
Case brief written assignment expectations:
Facts: This should be a quick list of facts, but make sure to include any legally significant facts.
Procedural history: These are notes about the journey the case has taken through the court system.
Issue presented: What is the legal issue that the court is discussing? Note, there can be more than one issue.
Holding: This is the ruling of the court. If the issue presented is a question for the court to answer, then the holding is the answer to that question.
Legal reasoning: This is a quick summary of the thought process used by the court to reach their conclusion.
Rule of law: If the court applied any rules of law that are important, you want to write that down too.
Concurring or dissenting opinions (if any): If your casebook included a concurring or dissenting opinion in your reading, you will need to read it carefully. It is there for a reason.
Citation: Required.
For examples on how to find a case, the attached document will help you start off in your search for cases to discuss and brief during this course.
I will provide picture of the case that need to be use for this case brief and also one of the references needs to be Chapter 8 of this book:
The Legal and Regulatory Environment of Business
9781259917127
Marisa Anne Pagnattaro, Daniel R. Cahoy, Julie Manning Magid

Categories
Ethics

Explain why the topic is important or why readers should care about the issue especially in the health care environment

Introduction
Introduce the ethical issue and the position that you intend to defend
Explain why the topic is important or why readers should care about the issue especially in the health care environment
Thesis statement
The thesis statement is the central position you will be arguing in this research paper. The thesis statement should be clear, concise, and defined.
In your thesis statement, you should take a specific stand on the selected ethical issue. For example, you may construct your thesis as follows: “The use of euthanasia is an immoral choice even when the patient is in constant, extreme pain”, or “It is immoral for patients to choose euthanasia even when suffering constant, extreme pain.”
Explain how your argument will be structured along which you will be arguing in support of your thesis statement
Background
The purpose of the background is to lay the foundation for proving your argument. The background will include the following:
Summary of works being discussed
Definition of key terms-define key terms/concepts
Explanation of universal values and principles in ethical decision making-briefly describe the key universal values and principles that support the ethical issue
Length and APA Requirements: 3 to 4 pages (can exceed the minimum length requirement). Utilize at minimum four appropriate references (i.e. scholarly resources, newspapers, books, PBSC library databases, Google Scholar, etc.) and in-text citations-APA styleLength & APA Requirement
I have attached the prompt to what the paper needs to be about. thank you!!

Categories
Ethics

Based on thousands of past papers i have read, your first sentence is the most likely sentence to have grammatical or stylistic issues, and of all paragraphs, your first one is the most likely to be the least readable.

n a three page paper, no more than 1200 words, no less than 950 words, double spaced, size 12 font, one-inch margins, address the following:
1) Describe one ethical dilemma you struggled with in your life. Put your description in a personal and historical context; in other words, use I statements, and locate yourself within place, time, and relationships. Do not spend more than a page and a half on your description. 50 Points
2) Analyze the dilemma by using theoretical tools provided by the text, handouts, or lecture slides. E.g., Schools of ethics or Lonergan’s operations of consciousness, etc. 50 Points
Helpful Hints:
1. Have a concise introduction, no more than one paragraph, no less than three sentences.
2. Clearly, and early on, state your dilemma in one sentence. E.g., “My ethical dilemma consisted of whether or not I tell my friend Emma (use pseudonyms) that her partner Elijah is cheating on her,” or “My dilemma was whether I leave my insurance information on the parked car I hit or whether I drive off,” or “The moral conflict I experienced was whether I report the incident I witnessed or whether I remain silent.”
3. Do not include any irrelevant information – there is not enough space in this short paper. E.g., if it is the first dilemma above, I don’t need to know about Emma’s relationship with her mother, or where she works, or Elijah’s preference for partying (unless it is relevant).
4. Do not leave out relevant information. 4a. if after your description your reader does not know what actually happened, or the gravity of what happened, then you are not saying enough. (e.g., leaving out what you meant by theft or cheating (taking something trivial or theft of the paycheck from a single mother; holding hands cheating or sexual intercourse cheating?). 4b. if you don’t feel comfortable revealing relevant information, then you probably shouldn’t. I.e., the case is too close and you need to pick another one. to write about.
5. If your dilemma involves a serious crime consider the following before writing your paper. FERPA protects your privacy against inappropriate sharing by faculty and administration. But it does not protect against a subpoena and the like.
6. Since this is YOUR dilemma, you need to carefully state what YOU chose to do and WHY you chose to do it. This will reveal your preferred school of ethics in this instance. E.g., If you worried that Emma could, with continued sexual activity with Elijah who is cheating, acquire an STD, or that Elijah could bring another life into the world causing Emma emotional and financial stress, then you are clearly using consequentialism. If you worry that your source for the information is unreliable and that Emma will drop you as a friend if you tell her, then also consequentialism. If, on the other hand, you were angered at the cheating and subsequent lying (to your friend by their partner) and your anger was located in the ideal of promise-keeping, a value for truth-telling, and relational fidelity, then you are clearly using Virtue Ethics. Make sure you explain the theory (Lonergan or Schools) you are drawing on and how it applies in detail.
5. Based on thousands of past papers I have read, your first sentence is the most likely sentence to have grammatical or stylistic issues, and of all paragraphs, your first one is the most likely to be the least readable. Suggestion: write your introductory paragraph LAST.
6. Finally, come up with a concise summary conclusion about whether you would make the same choice knowing what you know now, or something you learned about yourself.

Categories
Ethics

When in rome do as the romans do.

Ruth Macklin is trying to develop a principled middle ground between two extreme views on what to do with cultural beliefs and practices when they conflict with conflict with Western Bioethical beliefs and practices. The two extremes are:
Always accommodate the other culture. The customer is always right. This show respect.
Never accommodate the other culture. People must assimilate. When in Rome do as the Romans do. They are in Rome now.
Macklin’s position is attempting to show that some alleged conflicts are misunderstanding of the Western position (particularly on Informed Consent) and tries to articulate principles which gives guidance to when these practices can be tolerated and accommodated and when they should not be. One or the ways she does this is by discussing an array of cases and teasing out the principles that should apply.
This exercise is a quick rundown of some of those cases (There is more case detail in Macklin’s article) plus a couple that I added .
The Rabbi’s case. Does Jewish Ethics and Autonomy conflict?
‘The rabbi told the story of a man with an abiding fear of cancer that visited his doctor because he was worried about a small growth on his upper lip. The pair had a long-standing physician-patient relationship, and the doctor was aware of the patient’s deep fear of cancer. When the patient paid a return visit following a delay in which the biopsy was examined, he said to the doctor: “It isn’t cancer, is it?” The physician, after a brief hesitation, reassured the patient that he did not have cancer. ….
‘The impression the rabbi sought to convey was that secular bioethics mandates truth telling to patients even when it means inflicting unwanted information. In contrast, the more benevolent Jewish medical ethics allows for withholding diagnostic information and can support telling “white lies” in order to avoid harming the patient.’
[“Although the patient did, indeed, have a form of cancer, it was a tiny growth confined to a small region of the skin, of a type that does not spread and could not have metastasized. The growth could be completely removed and there would be no further consequences.”]
Should the doctor tell the white lie?
There are exceptions to Informed consent. One of them is therapeutic privilege (see the module on Autonomy and Informed consent). Does this case qualify?
The Voodoo case I. Are believers in Voodoo incompetent to give consent?
A medical resident in a New York hospital questioned a patient’s ability to understand the medical treatment he had proposed and doubted whether the patient could grant truly informed consent. The patient, an immigrant from the Caribbean islands, believed in voodoo and sought to employ voodoo rituals in addition to the medical treatment she was receiving. “How can anyone who believes in that stuff be competent to consent to the treatment we offer?” the resident mused
Do you agree that a believer in voodoo is rendered incompetent to consent to treatment because this religion is so contrary to Western rationality?
The Voodoo case II. Who gets to determine treatment?
Two brothers of a Haitian immigrant were conducting a conventional Catholic prayer vigil for their dying brother at his hospital bedside. The patient, suffering from terminal cancer and in extreme pain, had initially been given the pain medication he requested. Sometime later a nurse came in and found the patient alert, awake, and in excruciating pain from being undermedicated. When questioned, another nurse who had been responsible for the patient’s care said that she had not continued to administer the pain medication because the patient’s brothers had forbidden her to do so. Under the influence of the heavy dose of pain medication, the patient had become delirious and mumbled incoherently. The brothers took this as an indication that evil spirits had entered the patient’s body and, according to the voodoo religion of their native culture, unless the spirit was exorcised it would stay with the family forever, and the entire family would suffer bad consequences. The patient manifested the signs of delirium only when he was on the medication, so the brothers asked the nurse to withhold the pain medication, which they believed was responsible for the entry of the evil spirit. The nurse sincerely believed that respect for the family’s religion required her to comply with the patient’s brothers’ request, even if it contradicted the patient’s own expressed wish.
Some cultures have family members make medical decisions for them (usually the Husband or elder member). Western doctrine of Informed consent allows a person to designate a surrogate decision-maker. What should be done in a case like this where there is palpable fear of evil spirits?
Mercury sprinkling to ward off spirits: Santería and public health. Can harm to others override religious practices?
A Santería ritual involves scattering mercury around the household to ward off bad spirits. Mercury is a highly toxic substance that can harm adults and causes grave harm to children. Shops called “botánicas” sell mercury as well as herbs and other potions to Caribbean immigrants who use them in their healing rituals.
Should we make this practice illegal?
Virginity Tests
(Non-Macklin) A young woman is brought to a Doctor and asked to check her for virginity (intact hymen). Doing so may expose the girl to stigmatization, or even put her at risk of being the victim of an honor killing. If the doctor certifies her virginity regardless of the result it may/will break the doctor’s compact of trust and honesty with patients. The tests are scientifically worthless because a non-intact hymen can be caused by many other things other than coitus.
See also: Virginity tests.pdf
Should the medical profession accommodate this practice of virginity tests?
Unwanted touching
(Non-Macklin) A female nurse is working with a foreign male doctor who likes to touch her in ways that Westerners think inappropriate and would not accept from American doctors. This doctor says this is just how doctors in his county express appreciation for their nurses. Do you accommodate the friendly gropes? (Adapted from a case study in International Council of Nurses publication).
How can Navajo give consent if they do not want to hear disclosure of risks?
Informed consent involves telling the risks and benefits of a treatment. But if risks are regarded as bad news, which is not to be spoken, then how is informed consent possible with the Navajo?
What do you do if the Navajo does not want to hear the risks of treatment?
Burning your baby’s belly to cure crying and appetite loss.
Another case vignette describes a Laotian woman from the Mien culture who immigrated to the United States and married a Mien man. When she visited her child’s pediatrician for a routine four-month immunization, the doctor was horrified to see five red and blistered quarter-inch round markings on the child’s abdomen (Case Study: Culture, Healing, and Professional Obligations 1993). The mother explained that she used a traditional Mien “cure” for pain, since she thought the infant was experiencing a rare folk illness among Mien babies characterized by incessant crying and loss of appetite, in addition to other symptoms. The “cure” involves dipping a reed in pork fat, lighting the reed, and passing the burning substance over the skin, raising a blister that “pops like popcorn.” The popping indicates that the illness is not related to spiritual causes; if no blisters appear, then a shaman may have to be summoned to conduct a spiritual ritual for a cure. As many as 11 burns might be needed before the end of the “treatment.” The burns are then covered with a mentholated cream.
Is this a practice that should be tolerated? Or reported to authorities as child abuse or what?

Summary of questions (You can paste and answer. Please us paragraphs)
Summary of questions (You can paste and answer. Please us paragraphs)
The Rabbi’s case. Does Jewish Ethics and Autonomy conflict?
Should the doctor tell the white lie to the patient who is afraid of cancer?
There are exceptions to Informed consent. One of them is therapeutic privilege (see the module on Autonomy and Informed consent). Does this case qualify?
The Voodoo case I. Are believers in Voodoo incompetent to give consent?
Do you agree that a believer in voodoo is rendered incompetent to consent to treatment because this religion is so contrary to Western rationality?
The Voodoo case II. Who gets to determine treatment?
Some cultures have family members make medical decisions for them (usually the Husband or elder member). Western doctrine of Informed consent allows a person to designate a surrogate decision-maker. What should be done in a case like this where there is palpable fear of evil spirits?
Mercury sprinkling to ward off spirits: Santería and public health. Can harm to others override religious practices?
Should we make this practice illegal?
Virginity Tests
Should the medical profession accommodate this practice?
Unwanted touching
Do you accommodate the friendly gropes?
How can Navajo give consent if they do not want to hear disclosure of risks?
What do you do if the Navajo does not want to hear the risks of treatment?
Burning your baby’s belly to cure crying and appetite loss.
Is this a practice that should be tolerated? Or reported to authorities as child abuse or what?
Summary question: Where do you think you stand on the accommodation of these practices?
Accommodate them all or Do not tolerate any of them or some yes some no. If the last do you have some principle(s) that differentiates the acceptable and the unacceptable? Macklin was arguing for the harm principle, prevention of injury to public health and some because they don’t conflict with Western bioethics.

Categories
Ethics

Assigned textbook: vaughn, l. (2019).

See Attached form for Essay instructions.
Assigned Textbook: Vaughn, L. (2019). Bioethics: Principles, Issues, and Cases (4th ed.). Oxford University Press Academic US.

Categories
Ethics

Create a 5-slide presentation, with speaker notes, that includes the following:

This assignment is designed to allow you to demonstrate your understanding of stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination by citing examples, exploring the causes, and addressing the challenges people face because of stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination.

Acts of prejudice, discrimination, and stereotyping must be identified and eliminated in all areas of society and especially in the workplace. These attitudes and actions affect employee working relationships and team dynamics. Prejudice, discrimination, and stereotypes can affect hiring practices, employee reviews, and task assignments. In this assignment, you also discuss ways to eliminate or diminish the presence of these issues in the United States.

Imagine you work in middle management at a medium-sized furniture manufacturing facility. You have been asked to contribute to developing your company’s new diversity training. You are assigned to prepare the section on stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination.

Create a 5-slide presentation, with speaker notes, that includes the following:
Definitions of the following terms:
Stereotypes
Prejudice
Discrimination
At least 1 example each of stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination
Causes of stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination
Challenges that people face because of stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination
Ways that stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination can be eliminated
Include APA-formatted references at the end of your presentation for full points.

Categories
Ethics

It is also an opportunity for personal and professional growth for your employees.

You want your employees working in an environment that embraces inclusion. Diverse cultural perspectives can inspire creativity and innovation, produce a higher quality experience for your guests, and enhance your marketing efforts. It is also an opportunity for personal and professional growth for your employees.

In this assignment, you identify challenging cultural diversity issues, examine the main causes and effects of the issues you have identified, and explore possible solutions for overcoming problematic issues.

Imagine you are the human resource director for a large hotel chain with locations in the following metropolitan cities:
New York, NY
Los Angeles, CA
Boston, MA
Detroit, MI
Denver, CO
Atlanta, GA
Miami, FL
Phoenix, AZ
Chicago, IL
Las Vegas, NV
Cleveland, OH
Little Rock, AR

You have been asked to write a report to your management highlighting problematic diversity issues that may arise in cities where your hotels are located. You have also been asked to propose possible strategies and solutions that will help to minimize the issues from affecting your diverse workforce.

Identify 3 challenging diversity issues to discuss in your report (e.g., race, class, gender, sexuality, religion, age, language, disability).

Write a 600-word report that addresses each of the 3 diversity issues you have identified. Each issue should be addressed in approximately 175 to 200 words.

Complete the following in your report:
Describe the 3 issues (select different issues than those you have addressed in previous weeks of this course).
Identify the city (or cities) where your hotels are more likely to see or experience each issue. Describe why you believe these issues will affect your business in the city or cities.
Examine the causes of each issue. From your perspective, why did each become an issue, and why does each issue continue to exist?
Identify the steps the company can take to address these issues and minimize the effects on your diverse workforce now and in the future. Consider both the perspective of the company as well as the individual.
Include APA-formatted references at the end of your presentation for full points.

Include a reference page at the end of the proposal.

Categories
Ethics

Write a 600-word proposal to send to community members to promote opposition to this social inequality.

Imagine you are the leader of your local community action team, and you are tasked with educating and addressing members of your community about a specific social inequality as well as inaccuracies and misinformation about social inequalities in general.

Your goal is to write a proposal that will inspire community members to participate in an action team campaign. This campaign will bring awareness and promote action to combat that inequality in your community.

Identify a social inequality that exists in your community to address in your proposal. Inequalities in economics and work, law and justice, or health and illness are discussed in the textbook.

Examine aspects of cultural diversity that relate to social inequalities. In your examination, look for some of the causes and effects of those inequalities and consider strategies for eliminating them.

Write a 600-word proposal to send to community members to promote opposition to this social inequality. Your proposal will be distributed to local businesses, universities, religious organizations, and social organizations.

Include the following in your proposal:
A list of community leaders, teachers, students, business employees (at all levels) you would like to be involved in the action team campaign and why you value their contributions
Specific examples of the social inequality along with what you believe are some of the causes for this and how it affects the community
Information that encourages participation in the campaign and demonstrates that the social inequality is truly an issue. Review the U.S. Census Bureau and U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics for more information.
A description of how the campaign will make people aware of the inequality and what actions will be taken to fight for the elimination of this inequality
Include APA-formatted references at the end of your presentation for full points.

Include a reference page at the end of the proposal.

Categories
Ethics

List 4 cultural identifiers that you identify with most (e.g., asian american, female, and so on).

Imagine you are a member of a newly developed diversity team in your workplace. Your team is considering how individual identity contributes to cultural diversity. Your team leader has asked each member to take time to reflect on the personal identity and the aspects of cultural diversity you represent and how understanding your own traits affect your perspective of cultural diversity. Keep in mind that identity is more than what people “see” when they look at you.

Write a 600-word reflection, completing the following:
Using what you learned in the reading assignments for Weeks 1 and 2, describe what cultural diversity means to you. Include identifiers of cultural diversity such as race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, language, age, disability, religion, and so on. (Remember, there is a variety of characteristics of and contributors to cultural diversity.)
List 4 cultural identifiers that you identify with most (e.g., Asian American, female, and so on).
Reflect on your identified cultural traits. Based on your reflection, how might understanding your own traits affect your perspective of cultural diversity in and outside of the workplace?
Include APA-formatted references at the end of your presentation for full points.

Include a reference page at the end of the reflection.

Categories
Ethics

Rule of law: if the court applied any rules of law that are important, you want to write that down too.

Use the following picture for the case selection that’s all you will need. No chapter or anything just the case I need you to use the case from the picture.
Name of the case: Kelo v. Of new London, Connecticut(125 S.Ct. 2655) 2005
Case Brief:
Read Chapters 05 & 06 prior to completing this assignment. Many case studies are included in your textbook. This exercise will help you to learn vocabulary and how to analyze the case and write a brief a case.
For every Case Brief:
You must find a case related to the weekly chapter. You can pull your case from the book or from the internet as long as you cite the sources.
Please write a short synopsis of the case using the brief outline below no longer than two pages. The synopsis should be typed, double-spaced, times new roman 12 font and printed in black ink.
Case brief written assignment expectations:
Facts: This should be a quick list of facts, but make sure to include any legally significant facts.
Procedural history: These are notes about the journey the case has taken through the court system.
Issue presented: What is the legal issue that the court is discussing? Note, there can be more than one issue.
Holding: This is the ruling of the court. If the issue presented is a question for the court to answer, then the holding is the answer to that question.
Legal reasoning: This is a quick summary of the thought process used by the court to reach their conclusion.
Rule of law: If the court applied any rules of law that are important, you want to write that down too.
Concurring or dissenting opinions (if any): If your casebook included a concurring or dissenting opinion in your reading, you will need to read it carefully. It is there for a reason.
Citation: Required.
For examples on how to find a case, the attached document will help you start off in your search for cases to discuss and brief during this course.